How to teach your child to drive

How to teach your child to drive

One of the scariest times in a parent’s life is when their child becomes old enough to get behind the wheel of a car. Eventually, the time will come when a parent must wave goodbye as their teen pulls out of the driveway all on his own. When that time comes, it will be a little easier if a parent knows he has done all that he can to teach his child to be a safe driver. How can you help your teenager learn to be a safe driver?

First, it is very important that you make sure your teen takes a driver’s education class at school. Not only will this help her develop better driving skills, it may also reduce insurance premiums, which tend to be exorbitant for teenagers. Most drivers’ education classes ensure that teens have a minimum number of hours behind the wheel. They also show realistic and often graphic films which illustrate the hazards that can occur in automobile accidents.

It isn’t enough to place most of the responsibility of teaching your teen to drive upon the shoulders of your school district, however. It only makes sense that your teenager gets as much driving practice as possible, and who better to teach her than you? Obviously, the qualifications for receiving a driver’s permit and license differ from state to state, but many states allow fifteen year olds to obtain a driver’s permit. This means they are allowed to drive a vehicle if a licensed adult is in the car with them, also.

When you begin teaching your teen to drive, you will need to choose a road that is very rarely traveled. You can also let him practice in large parking lots, preferably on days that the parking lot is not being used. Before he begins actually driving, he should spend some time becoming familiar with the inside of the car, including the lights, gear shift, brakes, gas pedal, etc. Have him adjust the seat, rearview mirror, and side mirrors.

You should begin your child’s driving lesson by instructing him to always keep his foot on the brake when he is starting the car. He should also always place the car into park before letting anyone else in or out of the car. Have him practice finding the gears. He can do this without moving the car out of the drive way if it is an automatic. Once he has familiarized himself with the inside of the car, let him practice backing up and pulling forward in the driveway several times.

When your teen gets ready to begin actually driving, it is important that distractions are kept to a minimum. You should continuously caution your teen against adjusting the radio, talking on a cell phone, eating, or putting on makeup while driving. You should also stress to your teen that she should always keep both hands on the wheel of the car.

As your child becomes a more capable driver, give her plenty of opportunities to drive in a variety of situations with you beside her. These should include rainy weather, night driving, city driving, highway driving, and, later, interstate driving. Remember, the more practice she has, the better driver she’ll become.

Once your child has obtained her driver’s license, she will want to venture out on her own. She will probably not want you to treat her as a novice driver, but it is important to remember that she is one. Don’t allow her to drive her car with several other teens along for the ride. The more passengers she has, the greater risk of distractions and possible accidents that could occur. Make sure that she always has a cell phone with her, in case of any problems. Caution her to stay away from dark parking areas. She should always park in a well-lit area.

If an unmarked police car attempts tOne of the scariest times in a parent’s life is when their child becomes old enough to get behind the wheel of a car. Eventually, the time will come when a parent must wave goodbye as their teen pulls out of the driveway all on his own. When that time comes, it will be a little easier if a parent knows he has done all that he can to teach his child to be a safe driver. How can you help your teenager learn to be a safe driver?

First, it is very important that you make sure your teen takes a driver’s education class at school. Not only will this help her develop better driving skills, it may also reduce insurance premiums, which tend to be exorbitant for teenagers. Most drivers’ education classes ensure that teens have a minimum number of hours behind the wheel. They also show realistic and often graphic films which illustrate the hazards that can occur in automobile accidents.

It isn’t enough to place most of the responsibility of teaching your teen to drive upon the shoulders of your school district, however. It only makes sense that your teenager gets as much driving practice as possible and who better to teach her than you? Obviously, the qualifications for receiving a driver’s permit and license differ from state to state, but many states allow fifteen year olds to obtain a driver’s permit. This means they are allowed to drive a vehicle if a licensed adult is in the car with them, also.

When you begin teaching your teen to drive, you will need to choose a road that is very rarely traveled. You can also let him practice in large parking lots, preferably on days that the parking lot is not being used. Before he begins actually driving, he should spend some time becoming familiar with the inside of the car, including the lights, gear shift, brakes, gas pedal, etc. Have him adjust the seat, rearview mirror, and side mirrors.

You should begin your child’s driving lesson by instructing him to always keep his foot on the brake when he is starting the car. He should also always place the car into park before letting anyone else in or out of the car. Have him practice finding the gears. He can do this without moving the car out of the drive way if it is an automatic. Once he has familiarized himself with the inside of the car, let him practice backing up and pulling forward in the driveway several times.

When your teen gets ready to begin actually driving, it is important that distractions are kept to a minimum. You should continuously caution your teen against adjusting the radio, talking on a cell phone, eating, or putting on makeup while driving. You should also stress to your teen that she should always keep both hands on the wheel of the car.

As your child becomes a more capable driver, give her plenty of opportunities to drive in a variety of situations with you beside her. These should include rainy weather, night driving, city driving, highway driving, and, later, interstate driving. Remember, the more practice she has, the better driver she’ll become.

Once your child has obtained her driver’s license, she will want to venture out on her own. She will probably not want you to treat her as a novice driver, but it is important to remember that she is one. Don’t allow her to drive her car with several other teens along for the ride. The more passengers she has, the greater risk of distractions and possible accidents that could occur.

Make sure that she always has a cell phone with her, in case of any problems. Caution her to stay away from dark parking areas. She should always park in a well-lit area. If an unmarked police car attempts to pull her over, she should continue to drive until she reaches a populated area, such as a parking lot or business. She should never pick up hitchhikers!

Once a teenager reaches sixteen, she may think she is an accomplished and responsible driver. While she might be responsible, she is still inexperienced. It is important that she has as much practice as possible, and that certain guidelines are enforced in order to keep her as safe as possible.
o pull her over, she should continue to drive until she reaches a populated area, such as a parking lot or business. She should never pick up hitchhikers!

Once a teenager reaches sixteen, she may think she is an accomplished and responsible driver. While she might be responsible, she is still inexperienced. It is important that she has as much practice as possible, and that certain guidelines are enforced in order to keep her as safe as possible.

Once a teenager

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